Two Weeks In: SBG Thoughts

I’m liking this whole SBG thing. Here are a couple of reasons why I like how it’s working so far.

1. I feel like I can expect clarity from my students.
When grading in the past, I often found myself interpreting students’ answers. “Well,” I would say to myself when reading a response that could have been clearer, “he’s saying this, but I’m pretty sure he means this, so I’ll give him credit, or only take off one point.” That was something I didn’t like about myself as a teacher…but at the same time, if the question was worth 5 points, marking it completely wrong would hurt their grade. What if they really did get it, and they just didn’t make that clear? Not good for me to take points away, necessarily. But on the other side, what if I decided they got it, but they really didn’t? I hated those times when a kid would say, “Really? I got some points on this question? How’d THAT happen? I just put down a random guess!”

Now, though, I don’t have to worry about the points. A geometry student wrote down that the pattern for a sequence of numbers was “divide the number and its quotient by two, then two again.” I was pretty sure he understood that the pattern was to divide a term by two in order to get the next term, but that wasn’t quite what he communicated. So I gave him a score of 3 on that Learning Target (there were other aspects of the problem wherein he demonstrated better understanding, but he wasn’t all the way there). He came back for a reassessment and showed me that he did understand it clearly. He wasn’t stuck with a bad grade, and I wasn’t stuck having to guess whether he got it or not. Taking the focus away from the points lets me demand excellence in their communication skills, and so far, they’re rising to the occasion.

2. I can see clear relationships between students’ homework effort and their understanding.
I am keeping track of homework completion as a gradebook category that I’ve set to 0%, and I just mark each assignment as 0 (less than 25% done), 1 (25-75% done), or 2 (more than 75% done). With the scores on quizzes separated into Learning Targets, it is so clear that there’s a connection between doing the homework and understanding the material. I love how this system lets me see that the kids who scored low on Concept X are the same kids who got 0’s or 1’s on the homework for Concept X. Much clearer than a score on Test #3.

3. Students are taking charge of their grades.
They aren’t asking for extra credit or how they can bring their grade up. They’re coming to me and saying, “I want to have a reassessment for Learning Target 2, the one about domain and range.” Some of my high achievers are shocked to realize that they got a 75% on something (if they scored 3 on my 4-point scale), but I just say, “You know what to do if you’re not satisfied with that,” and they say, “Right. Reassess. Can I come in at lunch on Tuesday?”

—–

So, yeah, I think the SBG kool-aid tastes better and better. Some things I need to work on:

A. Broader Learning Targets.
I knew when I was writing them that I was probably focusing too narrowly, but now that I’m walking it out I’m seeing how I can make LTs that are more broadly defined. This may be something I just make notes to myself about and then change next year, since I already made up all the LTs for the year. I have decided at assessment time to skip a Learning Target here and there, but I think the overall restructuring is something I’ll just do next year.

B. More frequent assessments.
I have never been good at remembering to give frequent quizzes. I’ll plan them, and then forget to announce them, and then it ends up being too close to the test over the whole unit, so…yeah. With SBG, though, I really want to give more frequent but shorter assessments. The biggest thing really is remembering to announce it to the students. I don’t know why that’s always been such a challenge for me. Right now it isn’t helped by the fact that I’m still figuring out how to pace things with math.

Those aren’t the only things I need to work on, but they’re the most glaring in my mind right now.

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Comments

  • Jason Buell  On September 4, 2010 at 2:53 am

    Good stuff to hear. I’m glad it’s going well. For #2 do you graphically display that to your kids? I’ve done that a few times (I don’t keep track, but have them self-report a percent estimate) and it’s really hit home the relationship between the amount of work put in and the amount of learning achieved.

    • Amanda  On September 4, 2010 at 6:54 am

      I haven’t, but that’s a great idea!

  • brainopennow  On September 7, 2010 at 9:15 pm

    as yes, using math to prove a point!

    thanks for the reflection. Our school year is starting next year and I’m glad to here some positive results as I attempt SBG for the first time.

  • hillby  On September 26, 2010 at 11:54 am

    Quizzes – we have block scheduling, 100 minute classes every other day. So I promised my students we would have a quiz every other class. 2 weeks in, and they already expect it. I just keep the quizzes to less than 20 minutes.

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